Poetry

To-be-a-poet-is-a-condition

Poetic structures:

Sonnet

A poem of fourteen lines that follows a strict rhyme scheme and specific structure. The terms ‘sonnet’ was derived from the Italian word sonetto (from Old Provençal sonet a little poem, from son song, from Latin sonus a sound)

Couplet

A pair of lines of metre in poetry, usually two lines that rhyme and have the same metre. A couplet may be formal (closed) wherein each of the two lines is end-stopped, implying that there is a grammatical pause at the end of a line of verse; or run-on (open), wherein the meaning of the first line continues to the second.

Iamb

An iamb is a beat in a line of poetry where one unstressed syllable is followed by a stressed syllable. Iamb sounds like a heartbeat, sort of like duh-DUH.

Iambic Tetrameter

A line of poetry with four beats of one unstressed syllable, followed by one stressed syllable. When four beats are placed together in a line of poetry, it is called tetrameter. When we combine iamb with tetrameter, it is and it is called iambic tetrameter. It sounds like: duh-DUH, duh-DUH, duh-DUH, duh-DUH. Some believe that tetrameter is a natural rhythm and that it is easy to read out loud. After each 8-syllable line, the reader tends to pause.

Iambic pentameter

The term describes the rhythm that the words establish in that line, which is measured in small groups of syllables called “feet”. The word “iambic” refers to the type of foot that is used, known as the iamb, which in English is an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable. The word “pentameter” indicates that a line has five of these “feet”.

Haiku

“Haiku” is a traditional form of Japanese poetry. Haiku poems consist of 3 lines. The first and last lines of a Haiku have 5 syllables and the middle line has 7 syllables. The lines rarely rhyme.

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